• Stasikomödie und Auswärtsspiel - Die Toten Hosen in Ost-Berlin
    • Whereas Stasikomödie is a really funny take on how the DeWikiPedia:Stasi might have tried to subvert the East-Berlin art scene in the Eighties, Auswärtsspiel is a documentary that shows how they did exactly that (amongst many other things, it's more about the music than the attention it got from the authorities). Seeing both films so close after one another, it's eery that what makes you laugh one day, gives you the creeps the next when you realize it used to be real. So watch the former for hearty laughs, and the latter for a reality check and some German punk.

  • Against The Ice
    • Chronicling a Danish Greenland expedition trying to find remains of an earlier expedition, this Netflix movie develops into the story two men trying to achieve that goal, and later just to stay alive against the difficulties the Arctic stacks up against them, from food shortage and treacherous ice, to polar bears and the mental consequences of loneliness.

  • Edward Scissorhands
    • Not the kind of movie I would have watched when it came out, but Tim Burton's films have grown on me since then. It's an amazing world where everybody accepts Edward as he is, and everybody tries to take advantage of him. Except for one young woman who realized his true self, and tries in vain to help him. So it's a mixture of the astonishing and the predictable.

  • The Mummy Returns
    • My review of The Mummy said More action and comedy than horror, even though death comes via the undead (or rather, the reawakened dead) and flesh-eating bugs. It's a bit predictable who gets it, but still fun to wait and see how so, and how the others get away. Good summer fare. All still true, just substitute flesh-eating bugs by scorpions.

  • Eingeschlossene Gesellschaft
    • 6 teachers are trapped by a father who wants to force them to give his son a better grade. Lots of discussions ensue about who gets to judge whom, and how, and who is least morally compromised to do so. Turns out none of them is, and personal shortcomings are dragged into the light in greater detail than any of them wants to. Bottom line: this particular school -certainly many of its teachers- are thoroughly stuck in the past.

  • The First Great Train Robbery
    • Based on the true events of the WikiPedia:Great_Gold_Robbery, Sean Connery and my favorite Donald Sutherland go about stealing gold from a running railway in 1855, the first time ever this was attempted. While in the movie they got away with it, in real life they weren't quite so lucky. But it's an entertaining movie that mostly focuses on the detailed planning and the execution of the plan.

  • Meet the Fockers
    • The sequel to Meet the Parents, this one pits buttoned-up Robert de Niro against freewheelin' Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand. More of the same, really, but still funny, and sufficiently different to make it worthwhile watching.

  • Meet the Parents
    • I had originally skipped this one, as I'm not a big Ben Stiller fan, but watched it now - and it was funny indeed. Stiller always seems to plays the same character (basically himself, one suspects), but as a hapless future son-in-law to a suspicious Robert de Niro, it works.

  • Central Intelligence
    • A comedy that unfortunately thinks it can transport serious issues along the way, but only manages to get preachy and soapy. Luckily, the action sequences have plenty of humor to save the day.

  • Notting Hill
    • Romcom where some of the usual parts of "they met, they fall in love, they lose each other, they get together for good" (her being a famous actress, him being a rather less-known bookshop owner) get rather short shrift. The "com" parts are provided by the family and friends of him, not so much by the "rom" parts.

  • Toy Story 4
    • Venturing out into the great wide open, there are lots of opportunities for toys to get lost, but naturally, by sticking together, it all goes well in the end, and Woody can finally let go of the other toys to pursue his own life. The film would have benefited from cutting a few minutes that get too sappy towards the end.

  • Toy Story 3
    • Andy's off to college, so some hard decision about what to keep and what to chuck need to be made. But things go wrong, and the toys need to scramble to stay together, and fight off a gang of toys gone bad at the local daycare.

  • Don't Look Up
    • IMDb labels this one as comedy, drama and Sci-Fi. To me, it's a comedy, although it's probably meant as a satire, but it hits my funny bone. It's all rather over the top, and in the end, Earth is actually destroyed. Pity Leonardo Di Caprio's character who just can't understand how to deliver important messages in an elevator statement; these days, how do you become a tenured professor without that skill?


Movies I've seen in the past: MoviesIn2021 - MoviesIn2020 - MoviesIn2019 - MoviesIn2018 - MoviesIn2017 - MoviesIn2016 - MoviesIn2015 - MoviesIn2014 - MoviesIn2013 - MoviesIn2012 - MoviesIn2011 - MoviesIn2010 - MoviesIn2009 - MoviesIn2008 - MoviesIn2007 - MoviesIn2006 - MoviesIn2005 - MoviesIn2004