• Berlinale 2019
    • Zur Sache, Schätzchen
      • A film very much of its time - 1968. There isn't a whole lot of a plot to talk about, except maybe that young people do things differently than their elders and the authorities expect them to. They show a funnier alternative to protesting the older generation than their compatriots who in those days took to the streets to demonstrate for political and societal change.
    • Synonymes
      • A disaffected young Israeli decides to cut his ties with his home country and moves to France. His motivations and actions are rarely explained, nor are those of a couple he befriends. The worst Berlinale film I ever saw... and it won the competition. Even the protagonist was praised for his acting, which IMO was underwhelming as well. It's a mystery to me what people see in this movie, but then, the Berlinale prides itself on being edgier and more political than other festivals - maybe that's the explanation.
    • Watergate
      • A 4 hour documentary of the Watergate affair, all the way from the beginnings of the Nixon presidency to his pardon by Gerald Ford - a suspenseful thriller all the way through. It mixes historical footage, reenactments of the Oval Office meetings captured on tape, and interviews with some of the involved figures that were willing to talk. Highly recommended.
    • Der Boden unter den Füßen
      • The lives of two sisters are examined: the younger is a consultant, always on the go to where her projects take her, and the older suffers from mental problems. Her suicide attempt forces her younger sister to engage with her more profoundly than was the case so far, while maintaining her perfect business image and having an affair with her boss. She pushes as far as she can, but something's got to give, and in the end it does, big time.
    • The Kindness of Strangers
      • The best of the competition movies I saw, but also the most conventional, and therefore least likely to win. When a young mother flees her abusive husband with her kids to New York City, she has little going for her: not much of a plan, not much money, and no connections. When she is forced to let strangers into her live to help, a restaurant turns out to provide a pivot point in various ways, and things begin to look up. Bill Nighy reprises a role similar to last years's The Bookshop.

  • Miss Congeniality
    • Maybe they should blow up the Miss America contest, just to put an end to it all. That's not quite what was supposed to happen here, and what is supposed to happen is prevented by the ever watchable Sandra Bullock as FBI agent. Her foray into a fashionable, sociable and largely empty temporary new self is fun to watch, a sort of ugly-duckling-to-swan transformation. As a plus, Michael Caine :-)

  • Womit haben wir das verdient?
    • When the 16-year old daughter of an atheist family announces her conversion to Islam, things are getting upset. Although the film is a comedy, it raises serious questions, and manages to highlight the difficulties of being Muslim in a Western society, without getting preachy about it all - a good comedic treatment of the subject.

  • Sixth Sense
    • Catching an old Bruce movie for the first time, this one surprised with a plot twist right at the end that shines a different light on everything you saw before. Dead people abound (the best-known line of the movie gives it away), but it isn't horror - more like mystery. And -surprise, surprise- Bruce doesn't wield a gun, and actually has a nice smile.



Movies I've seen in the past: MoviesIn2018 - MoviesIn2017 - MoviesIn2016 - MoviesIn2015 - MoviesIn2014 - MoviesIn2013 - MoviesIn2012 - MoviesIn2011 - MoviesIn2010 - MoviesIn2009 - MoviesIn2008 - MoviesIn2007 - MoviesIn2006 - MoviesIn2005 - MoviesIn2004